Professor William G. Naphy

When?
Thursday, April 12 2012 at 7:30PM

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Where?

35 Rosemount Viaduct
City Centre, Aberdeen AB25 1NE

Who?
Professor William G. Naphy

What's the talk about?

In the West, non-normative gender identification is often understood in the context of ‘sexuality’ or transgender/transsexuality which largely consider the entire issue within the context of binary genders where gender (as socially constructed) maps directly onto biology.  Many other cultures, both now and throughout history, have taken a radically different approach which posits multiple genders (usually with 3 genders but occasionally more).  This talk will look as these cultures and consider whether their approach might inform modern debates about identity and sexuality.

Professor Naphy received his doctorate (in Reformation History) from the University of St Andrews in 1993.  He was appointed a lecturer at the University of Manchester in 1993 and, in 1996, at Aberdeen where he was promoted to Senior Lecturer in 1999.  He was awarded a personal chair in 2007.  He is the author of six books with translations into six languages (including an up-coming translation into Bosnian for an NGO raising awareness of homosexuality in Bosnia) as well as numerous edited volumes and articles in scholarly journals.  
He has made frequent appearances in the media (Channel 4; Grampian TV; BBC-Scotland; BBC-Radio 4: Start the Week) as a specialist on the history of witchcraft, plague, and sexuality.  He contributed extensively to the media in the discussions surrounding the Kirk's position on gay ministers.  Most recently he was the historical consultant for Out in the World, a four-part series on the history of sexuality broadcast on Radio 3 last Autumn.
He is a leading authority on Calvin's Geneva during the sixteenth century as well as the history of crime and punishment in the early modern period.  He also is a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society. 
 

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